ParisAdrian Paci. Soft with sorrow

Adrian Paci. Soft with sorrow

Adrian Paci’s work is constructed in a relationship to moving images. He works from a corpus of multiple sources: amateur videos, YouTube clips, family films and cinema. For this new ensemble of paintings, Paci used as source material still images from video cassettes of weddings and funerals from rural Albania made between the 1990s and the 2000s that were given to him by friends. For other paintings such According to Pasolini (2023) and According to Paradjanov, Paci used as source material film stills from Pasolini’s Medea (1969) and Paradjanov’s The Colour of Pomegranates (1969) respectively, two authors whose films have inspired some of Paci’s earlier works.

Adrian Paci believes that before being a way of doing, painting is a way of seeing. Observing these images, they offer themselves as possible paintings. It does not matter whether the artist’s gaze attributes this pictorial dimension or whether they themselves carry this potentiality. The artist watches/finds/sees this physicality. The quivering of the colours, their transparencies, their thicknesses, the movement of the brush conspire to such an extent that carrying them onto the canvas becomes a necessity that follows the suggestion coming from the intrinsic quality of the image. “You just follow what you see, you apply your hands and the matter of the paint. As you would read a text aloud with the awareness that the voice is not only the text, it simultaneously produces a singular and somehow indipendent body. The painting then becomes the trace of this process,” says Paci. The painting has its own body. By standing autonomously in front of the viewer, it encourages dialogues and bold gestures. The painting does not conclude the process, it remains in a state of becoming, as if open, engaging the viewer to invest it with new possibilities. In this, Paci feels close to the two filmmakers whose imagination exploits a kind of collective memory (of history, of painting…) while moving the experience into an unexpected field for the viewer.

Gallery/ Peter Kilchmann

ft/ Kate Zaniewska and Franciszek Kizinski

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